Screen Studies
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Grindhouse

Grindhouse: Cultural Exchange on 42nd Street, and Beyond

by Austin Fisher

Austin Fisher is Senior Lecturer in Film and Television Studies at Bournemouth University, author of Radical Frontiers in the Spaghetti Western (2011), founding co-editor of the “Global Exploitation Cinemas” book series and editor of Spaghetti Westerns at the Crossroads (2015). He serves on the Editorial Board of the Transnational Cinemas journal, is Co-Chair of the SCMS “Transnational Cinemas” Scholarly Interest Group, and founder of the “Spaghetti Cinema” festival. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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and Johnny Walker

Johnny Walker is a Lecturer in Media at Northumbria University, UK. His writing on horror and exploitation cinema can be read in journals such as Horror Studies, the Journal of British Cinema and Television, and in his forthcoming books Contemporary British Horror Cinema: Industry, Genre and Society (2015) and Snuff: Real Death and Screen Media (Bloomsbury, 2015). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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(eds)
Bloomsbury Academic, 2016
  • DOI:
    10.5040/9781501322426
  • ISBN:
    9781628927474 (hardback)

    9781628927498 (paperback)

    9781628927467 (epub)

    9781628927450 (epdf)

    9781501322426 (online)
  • Edition:
    First edition
  • Place of Publication:
    New York
Grindhouse
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The pervasive image of New York’s 42nd Street as a hub of sensational thrills, vice and excess, is from where “grindhouse cinema,” the focus of this volume, stemmed. It is, arguably, an image that has remained unchanged in the mind’s eye of many exploitation film fans and academics alike. Whether in the pages of fanzines or scholarly works, it is often recounted how, should one have walked down this street between the 1960s and the 1980s, one would have undergone a kaleidoscopic encounter with an array of disparate “exploitation” films from all over the world that were being offered cheaply to urbanites by a swathe of vibrant movie theatres.

The contributors to Grindhouse: Cultural Exchange on 42nd Street, and Beyond consider “grindhouse cinema” from a variety of cultural and methodological positions. Some seek to deconstruct the etymology of “grindhouse” itself, add flesh to the bones of its cadaverous history, or examine the term’s contemporary relevance in the context of both media production and consumerism. Others offer new inroads into hitherto unexamined examples of exploitation film history, presenting snapshots of cultural moments that many of us thought we already knew.