Loading
Snuff

Snuff: Real Death and Screen Media

by Neil Jackson

Neil Jackson teaches film at the University of Lincoln, UK, and has published on popular cinema in various books and journals. He is currently preparing a critical study of Hollywood’s representation of the adult film industry. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

Search for publications
(ed), Shaun Kimber

Shaun Kimber is Senior Lecturer in Media Theory at Bournemouth University, UK. He is the author of Controversies: Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer (2011) and is currently working on the co-authored book Writing & Selling Horror Screenplays. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

Search for publications
(ed), Johnny Walker

Johnny Walker is a Lecturer in Media at Northumbria University, UK. His writing on horror and exploitation cinema can be read in journals such as Horror Studies, the Journal of British Cinema and Television, and in his forthcoming books Contemporary British Horror Cinema: Industry, Genre and Society (2015) and Snuff: Real Death and Screen Media (Bloomsbury, 2015). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

Search for publications
and Thomas Joseph Watson

Thomas Joseph Watson is Lecturer in Media Studies at Teesside University, UK. His research investigates the role of film form in the depiction of violence in contemporary audio-visual media. He has published on pornography, documentary film, and experimental video-art. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

Search for publications
(eds)
Bloomsbury Academic, 2016
  • DOI:
    10.5040/9781501304590
  • ISBN:
    9781628921144 (hardback)

    9781628921120 (paperback)

    9781628921137 (epdf)

    9781628921113 (epub)

    9781501304590 (online)
  • Edition:
    First edition
  • Place of Publication:
    New York
Snuff
Collapse All Sections

The phenomenon of so-called ‘snuff movies’ (films that allegedly document real acts of murder, specifically designed to ‘entertain’ and sexually arouse the spectator) represents a fascinating socio-cultural paradox. At once unproven, yet accepted by many, as emblematic of the very worst extremes of pornography and horror, moral detractors have argued that the mere idea of snuff constitutes the logical (and terminal) extension of generic forms that are dependent primarily upon the excitement, stimulation and, ultimately, corruption of the senses. Snuff: Real Death and Screen Media brings together scholars from film and media studies to assess the longevity of one of screen media’s most enduring cultural myths. Thorough, provocative, and well argued, the contributions to this volume address areas ranging from exploitation movies, the video industry, trends in contemporary horror cinema, pornography and Web 2.0.