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Sound, studios, and censorship: The Brit-Lit film, 1927–39

Greg M. Colón Semenza

Greg M. Colón Semenza is Associate Professor of English at the University of Connecticut, USA. His books include How to Build a Life in the Humanities (2015), The English Renaissance in Popular Culture (2010), Graduate Study for the 21st Century: How to Build an Academic Career in the Humanities (2005; 2nd ed. 2010), Milton in Popular Culture (2006), and Sport, Politics, and Literature in the English Renaissance (2004). He has published numerous essays on film and adaptation and is now working on a book about Powell and Pressburger’s wartime films. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Bob Hasenfratz

Bob Hasenfratz is Professor of English and Department Head at the University of Connecticut, USA. His books include Reading Old English (2005/11), Ancrene Wisse (2001), and Beowulf Scholarship: An Annotated Bibliography 1979-1990 (1993). He has written articles on medieval literature and culture and edits the Journal of Medieval Religious Cultures. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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The History of British Literature on Film, 1895–2015

Bloomsbury Academic, 2015

Book chapter

...On the first weekend of December 1929 at the Moulin Rouge in Paris, something unexpected happened at two showings of Fox Follies, a musical review produced by 20th Century Fox—first a near riot and then an organized protest. On Saturday...

What is Italian Cinema?

Mary P Wood

Mary Wood is Reader in European Cinema at Birkbeck College, University of London, UK. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Italian Cinema

Berg, 2005

Book chapter

...Outside Italy in the 2000s we see relatively few Italian films in cinemas, or on the small screen delivered by terrestrial or satellite television. Those distributed in other media forms, on videocassette or DVD tend to be art film...

Something for Nothing

Gary D. Rhodes

Gary D. Rhodes, PhD, is currently Head of Area for Film Studies at The Queen’s University of Belfast, Northern Ireland. He is the author of Lugosi (McFarland, 1997) and White Zombie: Anatomy of a Horror Film (McFarland, 2002). Rhodes has also written and directed a number of documentary films. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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The Perils of Moviegoing in America : 1896–1950

Continuum, 2012

Book chapter

...“I guess you know how much the award is tonight. THREE HUNDRED DOLLARS …” The way he said it put it in capital letters. “… Whether anybody wins tonight or not, there will be another Bank Night next week. If nobody wins tonight the award...

Internationalizing the Brit-Lit film: Hollywood and the world film market, 1920–27

Greg M. Colón Semenza

Greg M. Colón Semenza is Associate Professor of English at the University of Connecticut, USA. His books include How to Build a Life in the Humanities (2015), The English Renaissance in Popular Culture (2010), Graduate Study for the 21st Century: How to Build an Academic Career in the Humanities (2005; 2nd ed. 2010), Milton in Popular Culture (2006), and Sport, Politics, and Literature in the English Renaissance (2004). He has published numerous essays on film and adaptation and is now working on a book about Powell and Pressburger’s wartime films. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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and

Bob Hasenfratz

Bob Hasenfratz is Professor of English and Department Head at the University of Connecticut, USA. His books include Reading Old English (2005/11), Ancrene Wisse (2001), and Beowulf Scholarship: An Annotated Bibliography 1979-1990 (1993). He has written articles on medieval literature and culture and edits the Journal of Medieval Religious Cultures. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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The History of British Literature on Film, 1895–2015

Bloomsbury Academic, 2015

Book chapter

...Early cinema’s tenuous status dictated to a large degree the nature of the new art form’s relationship to literature. If the cinema needed literature to justify its cultural value, then literary films could hardly have been expected...

The Brit-Lit film after film, 1979–2015

Greg M. Colón Semenza

Greg M. Colón Semenza is Associate Professor of English at the University of Connecticut, USA. His books include How to Build a Life in the Humanities (2015), The English Renaissance in Popular Culture (2010), Graduate Study for the 21st Century: How to Build an Academic Career in the Humanities (2005; 2nd ed. 2010), Milton in Popular Culture (2006), and Sport, Politics, and Literature in the English Renaissance (2004). He has published numerous essays on film and adaptation and is now working on a book about Powell and Pressburger’s wartime films. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

Search for publications
and

Bob Hasenfratz

Bob Hasenfratz is Professor of English and Department Head at the University of Connecticut, USA. His books include Reading Old English (2005/11), Ancrene Wisse (2001), and Beowulf Scholarship: An Annotated Bibliography 1979-1990 (1993). He has written articles on medieval literature and culture and edits the Journal of Medieval Religious Cultures. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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The History of British Literature on Film, 1895–2015

Bloomsbury Academic, 2015

Book chapter

...In March of 2007, The New York Times announced the intentions of independent producer Vincent Newman to make a 100-million-dollar adaptation of John Milton’s Paradise Lost.Michael Joseph Gross, “It’s God vs. Satan. But what about...

The Sunday Blues

Gary D. Rhodes

Gary D. Rhodes, PhD, is currently Head of Area for Film Studies at The Queen’s University of Belfast, Northern Ireland. He is the author of Lugosi (McFarland, 1997) and White Zombie: Anatomy of a Horror Film (McFarland, 2002). Rhodes has also written and directed a number of documentary films. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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The Perils of Moviegoing in America : 1896–1950

Continuum, 2012

Book chapter

...Why they were blue remains something of a mystery. Some claimed that they were blue because of the strictness with which they were observed, as in the phrase “true blue.” Others say it was because of the color of the paper on which...

It’s Catching

Gary D. Rhodes

Gary D. Rhodes, PhD, is currently Head of Area for Film Studies at The Queen’s University of Belfast, Northern Ireland. He is the author of Lugosi (McFarland, 1997) and White Zombie: Anatomy of a Horror Film (McFarland, 2002). Rhodes has also written and directed a number of documentary films. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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The Perils of Moviegoing in America : 1896–1950

Continuum, 2012

Book chapter

...In the early years of American film exhibition, many experts argued that the experience could prove dangerous, causing physical harm to audience members. Reports in 1914, for example, claimed that attending the cinema could inflict...

Conflagration

Gary D. Rhodes

Gary D. Rhodes, PhD, is currently Head of Area for Film Studies at The Queen’s University of Belfast, Northern Ireland. He is the author of Lugosi (McFarland, 1997) and White Zombie: Anatomy of a Horror Film (McFarland, 2002). Rhodes has also written and directed a number of documentary films. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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The Perils of Moviegoing in America : 1896–1950

Continuum, 2012

Book chapter

...Travelling across America with his own projector during the early years of the twentieth century, Elmer McIntosh had great success by screening films like A Trip to the Moon (Méliès, 1902), The Great Train Robbery (Edison, 1903...

1895–1950: Origins of a Genre

Keith M Johnston

Keith M. Johnston is Lecturer in Film and Television Studies at the University of East Anglia and author of Coming Soon: Film Trailers and the Selling of Hollywood Technology. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Science Fiction Film : A Critical Introduction

Berg, 2011

Book chapter

...Scientific romance. Thriller. Trick film. Comic short. Fantasy. Scientific melodrama. Horror. These are some of the most common terms applied by industry, critics and trade press to films produced between 1895 and 1950, many of which have...

Attractions, tricks, and fairy tales: Visual and theatrical culture in the Brit-Lit film, 1896–1907

Greg M. Colón Semenza

Greg M. Colón Semenza is Associate Professor of English at the University of Connecticut, USA. His books include How to Build a Life in the Humanities (2015), The English Renaissance in Popular Culture (2010), Graduate Study for the 21st Century: How to Build an Academic Career in the Humanities (2005; 2nd ed. 2010), Milton in Popular Culture (2006), and Sport, Politics, and Literature in the English Renaissance (2004). He has published numerous essays on film and adaptation and is now working on a book about Powell and Pressburger’s wartime films. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

Search for publications
and

Bob Hasenfratz

Bob Hasenfratz is Professor of English and Department Head at the University of Connecticut, USA. His books include Reading Old English (2005/11), Ancrene Wisse (2001), and Beowulf Scholarship: An Annotated Bibliography 1979-1990 (1993). He has written articles on medieval literature and culture and edits the Journal of Medieval Religious Cultures. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

Search for publications

The History of British Literature on Film, 1895–2015

Bloomsbury Academic, 2015

Book chapter

...In 1897, The Phonoscope, a trade magazine “devoted to Scientific and Amusement Inventions Appertaining to Sight and Sound,” took a breathless moment to imagine the future of motion pictures in an interview with its hero, Thomas A....