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Geoff Andrew

Geoff Andrew is Programmer-at-Large at BFI Southbank, a regular contributor to Sight & Sound, and was previously Film Editor of Time Out London, UK. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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British Film Institute, 2005

BFI Film Classics

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...The Iranian Abbas Kiarostami burst onto the international film scene in the early 1990s and - as demonstrated by the many major prizes he has won - is now widely regarded as one of the most distinctive and talented modern-day directors. His...

2001: A Space Odyssey

Peter Krämer

Peter Krämer is Senior Lecturer in the School of Art, Media and American Studies at the University of East Anglia, UK. He is the author and editor of The Silent Cinema Reader (Routledge, 2003), Dr. Strangelove or: How I learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (BFI, 2014), and The New Hollywood: From Bonnie and Clyde to Star Wars (Wallflower Press, 2006). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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British Film Institute, 2010

BFI Film Classics

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...Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) is widely regarded as one of the best films ever made. It has been celebrated for its beauty and mystery, its realistic depiction of space travel and dazzling display of visual effects...

Aguirre, the Wrath of God

Eric Ames

Eric Ames is Professor of Comparative Literature, Cinema and Media at the University of Washington, USA. He is the editor of Werner Herzog (2014) and author of Ferocious Reality (2012). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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British Film Institute, 2016

BFI Film Classics

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...Aguirre, the Wrath of God (Aguirre, der Zorn Gottes) is and perhaps always will be Werner Herzog's most important film. Appearing in 1972, Aguirre put Herzog on the map of world cinema. But the film's importance also derives from the young...

Akira

Michelle Le Blanc

Michelle Le Blanc is a writer, broadcaster and film critic. She is co-author of Horro Films and Anime, amongst other titles, and editor of Kamera, the online film salon. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Colin Odell

Colin Odell is a writer, broadcaster and film critic. He is co-author of Horror Films and Anime, amongst other titles, and editor of Kamera, the online film salon. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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British Film Institute, 2014

BFI Film Classics

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...Successful in both Japan and the West, Akira had a huge impact on the international growth in popularity of manga and anime. Closely analysing the film and its key themes, Colin O'Dell and Michelle Le Blanc assess its historical importance,...

Alien

Roger Luckhurst

Roger Luckhurst is Professor of Modern Literature at Birkbeck College, University of London, UK. His many books include The Trauma Question (2008), The Mummy’s Curse (2012), and ‘Zombies: A Cultural History’ (2015). He is the author of ‘The Shining’ in the BFI Film Classics series (2013). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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British Film Institute, 2014

BFI Film Classics

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...A legendary fusion of science fiction and horror, Ridley Scott’s Alien (1979) is one of the most enduring films of modern cinema – its famously visceral scenes acting like a traumatic wound we seem compelled to revisit. Tracing...

Amores Perros

British Film Institute, 2003

BFI Film Classics

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...Amores Perros (2000) speaks to an international audience while never oversimplifying its local culture. This study of this film opens up that culture, revealing the film's relationship to television soap operas, pop music and contemporary...

An American in Paris

Sue Harris

Sue Harris is Reader in French Cinema at Queen Mary University of London, UK. She is an Associate Editor of French Cultural Studies, the author of Bertrand Blier (2001) and co-editor of France in Focus: Film and National Identity (2000) and From Perversion to Purity: The Stardom of Catherine Deneuve (2007), among other titles. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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British Film Institute, 2015

BFI Film Classics

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...An American in Paris (1951) was a landmark film in the careers of Vincente Minnelli, Gene Kelly and Leslie Caron. A joyous celebration of George Gershwin’s music, French art, the beauty of dance and the fabled City of Light, the film...

Back to the Future

Andrew Shail

Andrew Shail is Senior Lecturer in Film at Newcastle University. He is also the co-editor, with Joe Kember, of the journal Early Popular Visual Culture. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Robin Stoate

Robin Stoate is a doctoral candidate in English Literature at Newcastle University, UK. He has contributed articles to the Blackwell Encyclopaedia of Literary and Cultural Theory (2010). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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British Film Institute, 2010

BFI Film Classics

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...This compelling study places ‘Back to the Future’ in the context of Reaganite America, discusses Robert Zemeckis’s film-making technique and its relationship to the ‘New New Hollywood’, explores the film’s attitudes to teen culture...

Bicycle Thieves: [Ladri di biciclette]

British Film Institute, 2008

BFI Film Classics

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...Bicycle Thieves...

Blackmail

Tom Ryall

Tom Ryall is Principal Lecturer in Film Studies in the School of Cultural Studies, Sheffield Hallam University Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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British Film Institute, 1993

BFI Film Classics

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...Alfred Hitchcock’s Blackmail (1929) was the first major British sound film. Tom Ryall examines its unusual production history, and places it in the context of Hitchcock’s other British films of the period. Is is, Ryall argues, both...