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  • Colonial cinema
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‘To Take Ship to India and See a Naked Man Spearing Fish in Blue Water’

Colin MacCabe

Colin Maccabe is Distinguished Professor of English and Film at the University of Pittsburgh and Associate Director of the London Consortium. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Empire and Film

British Film Institute, 2011

Book

...I might have called this introductory essay ‘Never Apologise, Never Explain’. That was the advice offered by the late nineteenth-century Master of Balliol, Benjamin Jowett, to the young men whose education he oversaw, when the time came...
...The title is not a metaphor but the technical mechanism in a video camera. Black balance is an operation similar to white balance, a calibration of the tone and light level of white in a video camera. As white balance gives the camera...
...The Bantu Educational Kinema Experiment (BEKE) was one of the earliest colonial film units to operate in Africa. Spearheaded by the Geneva-based International Missionary Council’s (IMC) Department of Social and Industrial Research...
...Colonialism is an order of the visible. It is an enterprise that seeks to order and consists in ordering the visible world in a particular way, a mode of arrangement of the visible around the principle of dominatio. This explains its...

Sons of Our Empire

Empire and Film

British Film Institute, 2011

Book

...During Queen Victoria’s Diamond Jubilee in 1897, the Illustrated London News observed the ‘curious medley of soldiery representing various races of men, African, Asian, Polynesian, Australasian, and American’ from all over the British...

American Philanthropy and Colonial Film-making

Empire and Film

British Film Institute, 2011

Book

...Between 1920 and 1940 agents of the British government produced dozens of films intended for colonial audiences. Some were made to teach agricultural and medical techniques, while others were designed to raise awareness about broader issues...

Purab aur pachhim

Rachel Dwyer

Rachel Dwyer is Professor of Indian Cultures and Cinema at SOAS, University of London, UK. Her many publications include Bollywood’s India: Hindi cinema as a guide to contemporary India (2014); What do Hindus believe? (2008) Filming the Gods: Religion and Indian Cinema (2006); the BFI Screen Guide 100 Bollywood Films (2005) and a volume on Yash Chopra in the BFI’s ‘World Directors’ series (2002). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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100 Bollywood Films : BFI Screen Guides

British Film Institute, 2005

Book

...Although other films had already raised the issue of Indians in the diaspora, this film remains one of the most memorable even today. Following the early Indian nationalists, India, while lacking economic advantages, is seen as ’spiritual’,...

Lost and Found: Children in Indigenous Australian Cinema

Childhood and Nation in Contemporary World Cinema : Borders and Encounters

Bloomsbury Academic, 2017

Book

...The lost child figure in Australian cinema has always been white. See, for example, Peter Pierce, The Country of Lost Children: An Australian Anxiety (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1999); Elspeth Tilley, ‘The Lost-Child Trope...

The Carapace that Failed: Ousmane Sembene’s Xala

Laura Mulvey

Laura Mulvey is Professor of Film and Media Studies at Birkbeck College, University of London. She is the author of Visual and Other Pleasures (1989; second edition 2009), Fetishism and Curiosity (1996; second edition 2013), Citizen Kane (1992; second edition 2012) and Death Twenty-four Times a Second: Stillness and the Moving Image (2006). She made six films in collaboration with Peter Wollen, including Riddles of the Sphinx (1977) and Frida Kahlo & Tina Modotti (1984) as well as Disgraced Monuments (1996) with artist/fi lmmaker Mark Lewis. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Fetishism and Curiosity : Cinema and the Mind’s Eye

British Film Institute, 2013

Book

...Teshome H Gabriel, ‘Xala: Cinema of Wax and Gold’, in Peter Stevens (ed.), Jump Cut: Hollywood, Politics and Counter Culture (Toronto: Between the Lines, 1985), p. 335.The film language of Xala can be constructed on the model of an African...

‘The Captains and the Kings Depart’

Ian Christie

Ian Christie is Fellow of the British Academy and Anniversary Professor of Film and Media History at Birkbeck, University of London, UK. He is author of The Art of Film (2012). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Empire and Film

British Film Institute, 2011

Book

...Historians of empire, both on the left and the right, have been slow to recognise the early impact of ‘animated photographs’ picturing scenes associated with imperial events.As far as I am aware, no historian of empire, from Eric Hobsbawm...