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...What can we learn from call centres about the place of voice in documentary? Although these two sites – the offshore call centre and documentary’s vocal conventions – may seem at first to have little to do with each other, I will suggest...
...Scholarly discussion of documentary film and ‘the voice’ tends to focus on the politics of representation – who gets to speak for whom and how (see, for example, Nichols 1994; Ruby 1991). Given the power dynamics that often organize...

The Cinema and the (Common) Wealth of Nations

Lee Grieveson

Lee Grieveson is Professor of Media History at University College London, UK. He is the author of Policing Cinema: Movies and Censorship in Early Twentieth Century America (2004); co-editor, with Colin MacCabe, of Empire and Film and Film and the End of Empire (BFI, 2011) and Cinema and the Wealth of Nations: Media, Capital, and the Liberal World System (2018). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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Empire and Film

British Film Institute, 2011

Book

...In the mid-1920s, the British state began to make use of film to support a political economy increasingly predicated on colonial territory, imperial trade and the utility of a newly configured Commonwealth bloc. It did so in part...

Green Legend Ran (Gurin rejendo ran)

Philip Brophy

Philip Brophy is a film director, composer and sound designer. He is founder of the Cinesonic International Conference of Film Scores and Sound Design from which he has edited three books on film sound and music, the most recent being Cinesonic: Experiencing The Soundtrack (AFTRS Publishing, Sydney 2002). He has also written for The Wire, London, and Film Comment. He teaches cinema studies at RMIT University, Australia, and is the author of the BFI Screen Guides 100 Modern Soundtracks (2004) and 100 Anime (2005). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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100 Anime : BFI Screen Guides

British Film Institute, 2005

Book

...In the opening of Green Legend Ran for no apparent reason, a set of towering totemistic space-probes hovering in Earth’s stratosphere suddenly shoot down to penetrate the Earth and transform it into a barren wasteland. Sentient sculptures...

Patlabor – Mobile Police (Kido keisatsu Patoreiba)

Philip Brophy

Philip Brophy is a film director, composer and sound designer. He is founder of the Cinesonic International Conference of Film Scores and Sound Design from which he has edited three books on film sound and music, the most recent being Cinesonic: Experiencing The Soundtrack (AFTRS Publishing, Sydney 2002). He has also written for The Wire, London, and Film Comment. He teaches cinema studies at RMIT University, Australia, and is the author of the BFI Screen Guides 100 Modern Soundtracks (2004) and 100 Anime (2005). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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100 Anime : BFI Screen Guides

British Film Institute, 2005

Book

...A dumb question to be asked of any of the innumerable anime dealing with giant robots driven by humans is ‘but how could a single person operate something so big?’ Yet that is the serious question posed by the Patlabor – Mobile Police...

Film Distribution Networks within Europe

European Film Industries

British Film Institute, 2003

Book

...Distribution has always been important to success in the film industry. In this competitive age of global entertainment, marketing strategies play a decisive part in the success or failure of films in the international market. Distribution...

European and Pan-European Production Initiatives

European Film Industries

British Film Institute, 2003

Book

...As the previous chapter showed, film production in Europe is heavily reliant on state-aid mechanisms, tax incentives and television finance. The case for state intervention has been widely made, and public support, at regional and national...

Hope Deferred (1945–65)

Rogue Reels: Oppositional Film in Britain, 1945–90

British Film Institute, 1999

Book

...The sudden flowering of oppositional film culture at the end of the 60s made the preceding era appear, by contrast, something of a desert. The theorists of the 70s were more interested in the left film activity of the 30s than in anything...

Iczer-One (Tatakae! Ikusaa-1)

Philip Brophy

Philip Brophy is a film director, composer and sound designer. He is founder of the Cinesonic International Conference of Film Scores and Sound Design from which he has edited three books on film sound and music, the most recent being Cinesonic: Experiencing The Soundtrack (AFTRS Publishing, Sydney 2002). He has also written for The Wire, London, and Film Comment. He teaches cinema studies at RMIT University, Australia, and is the author of the BFI Screen Guides 100 Modern Soundtracks (2004) and 100 Anime (2005). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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100 Anime : BFI Screen Guides

British Film Institute, 2005

Book

...You’re in high school doing well. You don’t cause trouble, you respect your parents, and you’re just trying to do your best. Suddenly out of the blue you have to command and control some unearthly psycho-techno machine and battle...

Doomed Megalopolis (Teito monogatari)

Philip Brophy

Philip Brophy is a film director, composer and sound designer. He is founder of the Cinesonic International Conference of Film Scores and Sound Design from which he has edited three books on film sound and music, the most recent being Cinesonic: Experiencing The Soundtrack (AFTRS Publishing, Sydney 2002). He has also written for The Wire, London, and Film Comment. He teaches cinema studies at RMIT University, Australia, and is the author of the BFI Screen Guides 100 Modern Soundtracks (2004) and 100 Anime (2005). Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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100 Anime : BFI Screen Guides

British Film Institute, 2005

Book

...In futuristic anime, Tokyo is usually depicted as an urban orb of magnetic attraction that binds political, corporate, legal and criminal forces. As a ‘megalopolis’ of power, this notion is an extended symbol of the original fortresses...