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1960s

Amy Sargeant

Douglas Gomery is Resident Scholar at the Library of American Broadcasting and Film at the University of Maryland, USA. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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British Cinema : A Critical History

British Film Institute, 2005

Book chapter

...Spymaster Major Dalby (Nigel Green) keeping an eye on the ‘shrewd little cockney’ Harry Palmer (Michael Caine) in Sidney J. Furie’s 1965 The Ipcress FileVivian Nicholson’s memories of her upbringing in Castleford match the familiar...

Persona

James Mason

British Film Institute, 2018

Book chapter

...‘To be a successful film star as opposed to a successful film actor, you should settle for an image and polish it forever. I somehow could never quite bring myself to do that’ (Mason qtd. in Hirschhorn 1977: 22). Thus James Mason sums up...

Performance

James Mason

British Film Institute, 2018

Book chapter

...Throughout the previous chapters, Mason’s performances of self have dominated, with his screen roles discussed more broadly in terms of type, star image and ideological meaning. In particular, as seen in Chapter 2, Mason’s screen...

The Age of Acquiescence

Raymond Durgnat

Raymond Durgnat (1932–2002) was the author of many groundbreaking books about the cinema, among them Films and Feelings (1967), Sexual Alienation in the Cinema (1972), The Strange Case of Alfred Hitchcock and Jean Renoir (both 1974), a study of WR: Mysteries of the Organism (1999) in the BFI Film Classics series, and ‘A Mirror for England’ (2010) and A Long Hard Look at Psycho (2011) both republished in the BFI Silver series. Author affiliation details are correct at time of print publication.

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and

Kevin Gough-Yates

Kevin Gough-Yates

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A Mirror for England : British Movies from Austerity to Affluence

British Film Institute, 2011

Book chapter

...System as Stalemate Many intellectual critics admire the Wild Western poker-face, while repudiating dull stiff upper lip. Ultimately, of course, the American convention is at least as sentimental as the British. But one difference...